Tendo Unit is the only device to eliminate confounding variables caused by undesirable attempts of athletes to maximise their results (e.g. being fast only at the end of the movement which will produce better average and peak values but does not represent a better performance) by setting a % range for peak force and partial average power measurements.

Why should you adjust % Range for Peak Force measurement?

In some exercises, there can be two positions for Peak Force. One at the beginning of the movement and another at the end. To filter out the undesirable peak at the end of the movement, just shorten the range of the measurement of Peak Force.

Example Force x Time graph for back squat showing two positions for Peak Force, one at the beginning of the movement and another at the end
                Force x Time graph for back squat

Why should you measure Partial Average Power?

Sometimes average or peak power is not sufficient parameters for assessment of athletes’ qualities in weight training. Many athletes in effort to reach maximum power value try to accelerate at the end of the movement. This way, athletes reach high average and peak power values, but those parameters are misrepresenting the actual results. Simply said, being fast at the end of a movement is too late. These athletes do have high average and peak power values but with a low rate of force development. The rate of force development is a key factor in sports performance where explosiveness is required. The partial average power will help you to emphasise the rate of force development in your training and ensures the development of the explosive power.

ExampleBack Squat measured on waist

Ice Hockey Player Olympic Weightlifter
Body Weight 100kg 100kg
Vertical Jump Height 50cm 56cm
1Rm Back Squat 160kg 230kg
Average Power 954W 975W
Peak Power 2316W 1579W
Partial Average Power (40%) 803W 1073W
Peak Force up to 0.25 1320N/0.15 1574N/0.115
An example graph showing force and power of legs of an ice hockey player while performing back squat measured by Tendo Unit

          Ice Hockey player

An example graph showing force and power of legs of an olympic weightlifter while performing back squat measured by Tendo Unit

         Olympic Weightlifter